The Red Fox of Lake Clark

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 280 mm, f/8.0, 1/1000 sec, ISO 800, hand-held.

While at Lake Clark National Park, we had the chance to photograph a few more wildlife species besides the grizzly bears. This red fox made its appearance the first morning we woke up and went outside. I found its den in some shrubbery right by the lodge and under my window! Initially it was a bit shy and went back into its hiding area when it heard some noise, but that wasn’t its last appearance….

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 500 mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 2500, hand-held.

After we took off in search of grizzlies, we drove by the lodge later in the morning to find the red fox curled up on some rocks. It was bathing time as it cleaned up from the various pieces of shrubbery that were often caught in its fur, as you can see in the top image. The fox yawned quite often, giving us full view of those beautiful sharp teeth!

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 500 mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1250, hand-held.

We also caught its stretching routine when it got up from its nap. I was surprised by how skinny the fox was but was told that it was healthy and of a typical weight.

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 340 mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1250, hand-held.

Some of the close shots I took of the fox showed the health in its fur and face so I wasn’t as worried. We saw it going after some rodents in some of the rocks so it appeared that there was plenty of food near by. The quick spry nature of its movement also indicated that it was doing very well.

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 390 mm, f/8.0, 1/1000 sec, ISO 800, hand-held.

There were times when the fox looked very ferocious as it stood up. We saw some evidence of its confidence when one afternoon we saw it within 20 ft of a grizzly bear. As the grizzly bear started meandering closer to the fox with intent, the fox trotted off but not at a panicked pace that I would have expected.

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 500 mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1250, hand-held.

Despite the confidence, it had a sweetness about it that I was able to capture in the image below when it peeked out from behind some flowers to watch its visitors. It was quite a beauty.

Image: Red Fox at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm at 500 mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 2500, hand-held.

Stay tuned for more stories from Lake Clark! You can view these images individually and more not posted here in my portfolio located here.

Please also check out my new business for pain relief, the PABR Institute, at www.pabrinstitute.com, and subscribe to my email articles to get tips here to help you find relief in your body.

Author: Dr. Amy Novotny

Amy Novotny is a physical therapist, marathon/ultra runner and nature photographer. She treats patients for a variety of conditions but specializes in chronic pain and calming an overactive nervous system using special diaphragmatic breathing. She has used this technique to help her qualify and run in four Boston marathons! She enjoys the outdoors and can often be found running and hiking on trails in throughout Arizona. She attempts to capture the beauty of nature with her photography both locally in Arizona and also throughout the United States. She is becoming more interested in wildlife photography and attempting to capture the emotion of animal interactions. In her spare time, Amy volunteers as a photo guide for the Arizona Highways PhotoScapes nonprofit and shares her joy of nature with others. Please feel free to contact her regarding her photography, physical therapy or running.

6 thoughts on “The Red Fox of Lake Clark”

  1. Great images! Foxes have always fascinated me. Did you see the Nat Geo article some years ago on how the Russians had decided to breed for tame foxes that would make good pets? It took over 40 generations of selective breeding!
    .

    Liked by 1 person

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