Emperor Penguin Pals

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins walking across sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 440 mm, f/8.0, 1/2500 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

As I return back to processing images from Antarctica, I wanted to share several images that demonstrate the peaceful nature of these Emperor penguins. We saw so many of the adult penguins spending time with each other in pairs. I was told that typically all the males or all the females were at sea depending on the time of year, so I assume that most of these interactions were from the same gender. We were not able to distinguish if the majority of the adults were males or females at the colony during the 3 days we visited, but we enjoyed the bonds nonetheless.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 200 mm, f/8.0, 1/1600 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

Like humans who spend a lot of time together, the adult Emperors seemed to mirror each other’s behavior for a variety of activities. If one penguin was preening, the buddy nearby also got involved in preening.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins preening on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 500 mm, f/8.0, 1/1000 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

Occasionally, one of the penguins stood guard and watched, but it was typically for a short period of time before both were performing similar behaviors again.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 320 mm, f/8.0, 1/2500 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

They often played “follow-the-leader” with one of the adults leading the way and the second following along dutifully.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins walking on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 220 mm, f/8.0, 1/1250 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

Sometimes the lagging penguin found it easier and faster to slide on its belly to catch up with the leader.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins crossing sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 210 mm, f/8.0, 1/2500 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

In the case below, the penguin on the left was beginning to go into a belly slide down the iceberg with its companion watching carefully before deciding to join.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins on an iceberg, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 500 mm, f/8.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

We often saw both of the penguins on their bellies as they crossed over the sea ice. It was fascinating to see their flippers and feet become in sync as they propelled themselves forward.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins sliding on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 200 mm, f/8.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

Even when they took a rest, they matched their behavior to the one next to them, and I was able to capture this head-on.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins resting on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 500 mm, f/8.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

There was even symmetry when they were looking in different directions as their bodies mirrored each other.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins sliding on sea ice, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 360 mm, f/8.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

Their behavior and stance also balanced well with the surrounding landscape as I caught these two in front of a beautiful light-blue iceberg.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins on an iceberg, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 390 mm, f/8.0, 1/2500 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

No matter the scenario, the peace was evident.

Image: Two adult Emperor penguins on an iceberg, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500 mm at 220 mm, f/8.0, 1/2000 sec, ISO 400, hand-held.

I will continue with the Antarctic journey and share more posts in the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

You can view these images individually and more not posted here in my portfolio located here.

Author: Dr. Amy Novotny

Dr. Amy Novotny founded the PABR® Institute with the mission to provide pain, stress and anxiety relief to those who seek a naturalistic form of treatment when other treatment methods have fallen short. Her unique approach comes from her experience treating in a variety of settings and with a wide range of patient populations over the past 12 years. Her background in orthopedics, sports, geriatrics, balance disorders, nerve injuries, and most recently, chronic pain; and influences from coursework at the Postural Restoration Institute gave her the foundation to develop this treatment method to address a wide variety of painful and restrictive conditions. Her methods have helped countless people reduce and eliminate pain, stress, anxiety, orthopedic surgeries, sleep issues and the need for medications. She co-authored two Amazon #1 Best-Selling books Don’t Quit: Stories of Persistence, Courage and Faith and Success Habits of Super Achievers, which share her journey on how and why she developed the PABR® Method. Her ability to speak French and Spanish has allowed her to communicate with and help various clients from all around the world, including France, Mexico, Central America and South America. She has a variety of interests including running 40+ marathons, running 10 ultra marathons (including two 100 milers), completing an Ironman triathlon, photographing wildlife and landscapes all over the world that has led to several of her images being chosen as Photos of the Day, most notably National Geographic Your Shot World Top Photo of the Day. Visit her photography portfolio here!

8 thoughts on “Emperor Penguin Pals”

  1. Thank you so much Amy . it is truly a blessing to be able to be a part of this amazing adventure with you and the team you are with. Please thank all of them for use .And may God be with all of you. M@M 👏

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Love reading about the penguin behavior, and I think my favorite shot is the one of the two penguins playing follow the leader. So cute!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: